Monday November 20, 2017
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Scholastic Method of Lectio Divina

Lectio Divina ("Sacred Reading" in Latin) is reading with the heart of a few lines from Scripture. The scholastic method of Lectio Divinia has four moments and can be practiced alone or in a group :

The Scripture passage is read slowly 2 -3 times during each moment. If at any time we would like to have the Scripture passage read again during these four moments, we say so.

  1. Lectio - Reading the Word of God Listen carefully as the Psalm is read each time. Immerse yourself in the Word of God.

  2. Meditatio- Reflecting on the Word of God As the Psalm is read each time, notice what one Word or short phrase stirs your soul. Savor it. Absorb the Word or phrase that the Spirit speaks to you. Listen fully and allow the Word or phrase to take root in your heart. Offer up the Word or phrase aloud or silently.

  3. Oratio - Speaking to God As the Psalm is read each time, respond to the Word given to you by the Spirit. You may offer aloud or silently what you feel about the Word or phrase placed in your heart.

  4. Contemplatio - Resting in God As the Scripture Passage is read this time, the Word given to you by the Spirit becomes your Sacred Word pduring this time of Centering Prayer. The prayer period ends with final reading of the Psalm.

Please contact Tim Goldman if you have any questions or would like more information about Lectio Divinia. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling 745-9842.

Upcoming Events

Des Moines Silent Retreat
December 2nd, 2017
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Ames Silent Retreat
December 2nd, 2017
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Winter Solstice Contemplative Worship
December 20, 2017
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Contemplative Lounge
January 13, 2018
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Contemplation is essentially a listening in silence, an expectancy. And yet in a certain sense, we must truly begin to hear God when we have ceased to listen. What is the explanation of this paradox? Perhaps only that there is a higher kind of listening, which is not attentiveness to some special wavelength, a receptivity to a certain kind of message, but a general emptiness that waits to realize the fullness of the message of God within its own apparent void.
--Thomas Merton